Looking for Self Defense? Look no further than Revolution MMA Benton!

You’re about to Discover why the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program at Revolution MMA Benton is your choice for Self Defense Training !

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a martial art that was brought to the US by the Gracie Family and made popular in the UFC. It is a grappling art, and to put it simply it includes all of the things you see “on the ground” in a UFC fight. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu also includes standup work, similar to wrestling and judo. It’s awesome for self defense for men and women alike and one of the best solutions for Benton Self Defense and Fitness and here’s why:

Benton Self Defense

Revolution MMA offers World Class Benton Self Defense

1. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is awesome for Self Defense because most self defense situations end up on the ground!

If someone attacks you, you are likely to end up on the ground. Do you know how to get off the ground safely? Do you know how to get someone off of you? Do you know how to keep someone from putting you on the ground? These are all the things you’ll learn in one of  self defense classes at Revolution MMA Benton.

2. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu at Revolution MMA Benton is awesome for Self Defense because it builds confidence:

It’s a fact. Most people looking for self defense are looking for 2 things: skills and the confidence that comes from having those skills. When you learn legitimate life saving skills as part of our self defense program at Revolution MMA Benton, you’ll feel more confident and assured of yourself. This is important for men, women and children alike. Imagine no longer feeling inferior, scared, or weak. That’s what Brazilian Jiu Jitsu at Revolution MMA Benton will do for you.

3. Brazilian Jiu Jits at Revolution MMA Benton Empowers Women:

Revolution holds semi regular FREE Women’s Self Defense Clinics as a public service. These clinics teach women how to be safe and defend themselves against the most statistically common attacks and scenarios. Revolution’s Benton Self Defense program incorporates all of these principles in their regular classes as well. Let’s face it, women need Jiu Jitsu! Most likely, someone is going to try to grab and tackle you or carry you off. Jiu Jitsu can be a lifesaver!

4.  The Self Defense Program at Revolution MMA Benton is taught by experts: 

Coach Jory heads up the adult program while Coach Abby heads up the Kids program.  Both of these Benton Self Defense programs are unique in that the expert coaches teach more than just techniques. Jory uses his years of expertise to help his students develop their bodies and mind for performance. I mean let’s face it: no matter what “techniques” you learn, your success depends on your ability to physically perform them under duress. By training under a certified and expert coach in athletic development, you will learn faster. You’ll have a higher success rate when performing the moves, because you will be able to perform the mechanics correctly. As an added benefit of Revolution’s Benton Self Defense Program, you’ll have access to the best athletic development plans that will make you lean, fast, strong and take your performance to the next level. In fact, coach Jory recently presented as part of the 1st Annual RMNU Camp. He was invited to instruct from one of the world’s top black belts, Robson Moura, who trusts his expertise.

5. Self Defense Training at Revolution MMA Benton is Fun!

Jiu Jitsu is fun. You’ll meet new friends, you’ll get to go places and do things. You’ll feel great inside and out. Here’s some of the fun things members of the self defense program at Revolution MMA Benton have been able to do:

  • visit the beach for the first time
  • go to Time’s Square
  • compete across the nation
  • attend seminars and compete across the world in places like Canada and Portugal
  • train under the top MMA team in the world (nova uniao)
  • train with expert coaches and competitors from Brazil
  • lose weight & feel great
  • save their life

If you’re interested in joining us at Revolution MMA Benton , click here !  

We’ve got an introductory special with your name on it!

501-776-0606. 

 

Martial Arts Benton : Can Anyone Be A Black Belt?

Black Belt

" Can Anyone Be A Black Belt? "

This is one of the most controversial topics in Martial Arts everywhere, even in Benton.

“Can anyone be a black belt?” 

I had never pondered this question until I was a teenager about 8 years in to my Martial Arts journey.  As I moved through the years in Martial Arts, this question kept reoccurring. Depending on who you asked when, the answer was different.  I had never decided for myself, and then one day, as a gym owner, I was smacked in the face and forced to answer this question once and for all.  Keep reading, I’m going to give you a quick history lesson that led me to the shocking answer.

How did this question come about so many years ago? Well, an instructor at my gym was talking with my mom. We were pretty active in the gym and he would tell her all the latest happenings at times, even if he wasn’t supposed to. He told her he and the owner were discussing the topic. He didn’t feel anyone could be a black belt. The owner did. And that was a problem. Until that moment I had never entertained that thought. I suddenly felt very insecure and worried, even though I was already a black belt. I thought perhaps I might not “cut it” for advancement. I remember that day very clearly. I was a teenager, I think about 14 years old.

But let’s go back farther for a minute: From my experience training traditional Martial Arts since the 80′s and now owning a gym, I have been on the front end and experienced the “bubble” of 2 particular Martial Arts styles: Traditional TaeKwon-Do and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

When I began training TKD 20 years ago, it catered to the same age group as BJJ and MMA does now. Everyone who did it was tough. We trained in a skating rink actually, and it smelled funny.  Then we moved to a new spot that had a thin layer of carpet over concrete floors, and that’s about it. A bloody nose was an often occurrence, and the word “retention” meant nothing to school owners. They only wanted the hardcore students.  Testings at my gym above second degree were “secret” and no one could talk about it.  To test for my 2nd degree black belt I had to demonstrate a number of skill, knowledge and physical demonstrations, one of which was  going to my coach’s trailer park and running around the park for 2 miles. It was pitch black and I’d guess my age to be in the 10-13 year old range.  I remember trying to think what I’d do if someone attacked me. I’m not quite sure what my coach did during that time. If you asked those school owners like my coach if anyone could be a black belt, they’d most certainly laugh and say no. A black belt was for those guys who “made it” and never quit. Dojo storms were common, and people always tried to “check” one another’s rank, or try to prove something.

I remember moving to a larger gym 7 years in to my training. This gym was a little more main stream and they wanted me to wear this protective equipment called  headgear and mouth piece. It was absurd, or so I thought.  You also couldn’t punch someone in the face until you were a certain rank, and white belts didn’t spar right away. You actually waited a good 6 months before you even started sparring. I remember one of my first days there we sparred. I was in the black belt teen class and paired up with a nice black belt girl. I punched her right in the face as soon as they said go. She fell down and everyone stared at me. I was so used to trying to stay alive, that I did not know there was a concept called “flowing” or going easy on an opponent. I later learned that. If you asked these people if anyone could be a black belt, you might get a different answer. I will say this was a quality gym with tough ranking standards, but it was evident that the thought processes were changing.  As the years went on, it became obvious everywhere that the pendulum was swinging the other direction.

I began to feel myself wondering back to what I was used to and I would go train on the side at a local kickboxing gym that was less mainstream and much more hardcore.  This gym equally smelled funny, and unlike the big gym with fancy mats, it was back to a place with a think layer of commercial carpet on concrete.

Fast forward to 2003. By this point the TaeKwon-Do and traditional Martial Arts bubble was bursing. “No Holds Barred” was the new “tough guy” Martial Art, and traditional Martial Arts schools catered to mostly children (who could earn a black belt at the age of 5 btw).  I remember my first experience training BJJ. I enjoyed it because it reminded me of the times I first started training TKD. There wasn’t a lot of hooplah, the gym was small, no one washed their gi, the mats weren’t always clean, and some folks weren’t very nice, but I still liked it. There was no curriculum, you just kinda got beat tough and if you stayed you kinda made it, or so one might feel that way.  I do remember I did feel a bit “gross” after every class. Some folks I can say with 100% certainty never washed their body or gi in their life!  None of that mattered. The place was packed b/c BJJ was different than main stream Martial Arts philosophy at the time (by this time those TKD instructors would tell you anyone will be a black belt in 2 years).

BJJ didn’t hand out black belts to 5 year olds, it was real, it was hard! But ask these BJJ teachers the same thing: “Can anyone be a black belt?”, they would have most certainly said no.  In fact if you reached blue belt status you might as well have been a god. I had no idea what I needed to do to get a blue belt other than wait and keep training.  In fact my first BJJ teacher used to stand in front of the class and talk about how it took him 10 Years to get a black belt and it was gonna take us that long too (if we even made it). It was eerily similar to my past traditional Martial Arts experiences. Dojo storms started happening again. It’s the same deal repackaged all over.

Fast forward again to 2011. By now I’ve owned 2 successful gyms for 6 years. In addition to all of my years training and assisting at different gyms, I’ve now been 100% responsible for my own student’s progress. In this time I have often revisited the question “Can anyone be a black belt?”.  

I was faced with a lot of different considerations. I’ve had older students who wanted rank and claimed they couldn’t train like the younger students because they had commitments, families, and were older in years. They didn’t want to be held to the same expectations physically as a young person. I’ve had people get injured and still come to class yet not get rank because, despite their hard work, they could not physically perform the task. I’ve had folks who put little effort in to class and considered it a social event rather than training expect rank because they fulfilled their “class requirements”.  I have been faced with some tough decisions, and I was very stressed over my predicament.  I was in a pickle and it was decision time.

Was I being to hard on the older students? Was I not being accommodating to their family commitments?

Was I expecting too much? Was I being unreasonable or “old school”?

I was sitting there holding that pendulum in my hand, trying to find the right spot. On one side was those who give out black belts like candy, on the other were those like many of the gyms I trained at. Both set their students up for failure: One for handing out rank to those who didn’t deserve it and for NOT having a standard, the other for not having a means to get to the end, essentially for not facilitating the student’s journey. I didn’t want to be either. I wanted my students to get to black belt. I wanted to provide them a path, but I also wanted them to earn it. As I began to ponder the right answer I began looking in other places. I began looking at other professionals and quickly reconsidered my time at a university. I then considered an idea, a theory if you will:

“Earning a black belt in Martial Arts is no different than earning an advanced degree”

All sorts of people earn degrees, some have learning disabilities, some have families and work 2 jobs, some are rich, some are poor. Some need to take remedial classes first. Some go to school full time and live there and take 21 hours a semester. Some go to 1 class a semester and take longer to earn their degree. Some have to take time off for various reasons, and then return. There are people all in between. But anyone who meets the requirements can earn a degree! Those who want it bad enough will do anything to meet the requirements to earn that piece of paper! Next I began to look at the expectations most college professors held of their students for earning an advanced degree:

  • Did the part time students who had families and jobs receive special priviledges in class? Were they excused from excess work because of time contstraints? No.
  • Did the “older” students get to take longer to complete a test, or did they receive special help or accommodations, or even receive an exemption for certain tests or performances? After all everything declines with age: eyesight, hearing, memory, etc. (and by older I mean those not just out of High School) But in fact these “older” students were held to the same standards as all other students. Whether you were 18, 60 or anywhere in between, you were held to the same standard.
  • Were the students who intended to make a living from their degree treated differently than someone who just wanted to earn a degree for another reason (say a stay at home mom who just wanted an education “in case”)? No.
  • What would happen if I went to class and said I’d like to be a surgeon but: “I really don’t have time for this internship b/c I’m  not like these young guys who can live at the university and dedicate all their time to studies.  Afterall, I’ve got commitments! I’m a bit more forgetful than I was, and the tests are too hard!”  What would the professor say? He’d laugh. It’s absurd.

As I answered these questions, it became clear to me:

“You don’t have to be the top of Harvard’s graduating class to be a surgeon, and you don’t have to be a world champion to be a black belt.

But there’s one commonality: You have to meet the bar.”

There’s a standard of what it takes to be a surgeon, doctor, lawyer, etc.  While there are variations between those who pass, there’s still a minimum performance requirement that must be attained and demonstrated, regardless of age, sex, life situation, natural born ability, etc.  If you want to be a surgeon, you best be prepared to perform surgery. And you best be prepared to perform it correctly!

Ultimately that led  me to my decision!

“Anyone who meets the requirements can earn a black belt!”

So now this brings the question…Which of my 2 instructors was correct? Well, both were. One felt anyone could achieve black belt, I agree with this. With hard work, perseverance, and proper instruction, anyone can. The one who felt that not everyone can be a black belt felt so because, well, there were a lot of people approaching black belt who needed to make drastic changes in order to actually perform as a black belt. Essentially “not everyone can be a black belt in their current state”.  Anyone who didn’t come up as a lifetime Martial Artist would be wrong not to think that earning a black belt will require some drastic lifestyle changes. Afterall, if you are going to be a black belt, you had better be ready to perform like one. I’ve heard a number of excuses for people being black belts yet not being able to perform: I’ve heard 5 year olds justified as black belts because “their mind knows the moves but their bodies aren’t mature” I’ve seen folks who can barely raise a leg get promoted because “they know it, and if they were in better shape they could do it”.  I’ve also heard the excuse “I don’t want to be a competitor, so I shouldn’t be held to a tough standard.”  That’s crap! You’ve got to be able to do it. Period. If that means losing 100 lbs, waiting till a child is a tad older, training harder, or improving yourself any other way, you had better do it. Otherwise, you don’t deserve it.

The problem with Martial Arts is not that the arts themselves “suck” or are “ineffective”, it’s that in many gyms and organizations, it has become socially acceptable, even expected, that anyone can get a black belt even if they don’t meet the bar.  In fact it’s so commonplace now that instructors lower the bar bit by bit so more students can reach it.  Before you know it, the bar is on the floor and everyone is stepping over it with a bare effort to raise their leg. You don’t have to be a trained Martial Artist to notice it.  In fact it’s a problem because many people noticing it are not trained Martial Artists.  Show up at your doctors office and you can quickly tell if your doctor is qualified. Martial Arts is no different. This has trickled down to the students: In today’s Martial Arts systems, there seems to be a sense of entitlement running rampant amongst the students as well.  It could be just the overall degredation of American Society, or perhaps folks are under the false impression that earning rank in Martial Arts is the equivalent of earning a cookie for your hard work. I’m not sure. So, I had found the answer and now it was time to act.  I once had a college professor tell me “never lower the bar. Instead raise it and people will rise up to meet it”. She’s right. I set the bar. I expect everyone to reach it. I know everyone can reach it. It’s not a matter of “can do”, it’s a matter of “will do”.

“Everyone has the desire, not everyone has the will power to make it happen.”

So back to our question: “Can anyone be a black belt?” Yes! I did it, and you can too! But be prepared to rise up and meet the bar!  In fact don’t rise up to the bar, surpass it! 

Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton : Pure NU Lineage!

Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton : Pure NU Lineage!

These Days, not a lot of people can say that their Jiu Jitsu lineage runs pure.  More and more associations are forming and getting organized. With this comes a lot of changes. Some organizations are imposing fees or requirements as well as getting organized and offering services to competitors and clients. With this a lot of folks are jumping ship from one team to another.  Some because they don’t like the changes, others because it’s popular to open a gym and they are in search of getting rank from whomever will hand it out fast. I’m pleased to say that I have been 100% Nova Uniao since day 1, and all of our students at Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton can say the same.  This is a history of our team!

Nova Uniao is one of the top Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu teams in the world. It has been home to multiple World Champions in both grappling and Mixed Martial Arts. From Vitor “Shaolin” Riberio, to B.J. Penn, to Leonardo Santos, to Robson Moura, to Jose Aldo, to Benton’s Jory Malone the gym has played host to generations of talent and success.

Per Teammate Leo Santos, an account of Nova Unaio’s history:

Nova Uniao is the product of the combination of two of the most storied lineages in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Andre Pederneiras was one of the founders and was a black belt under the great Carlson Gracie, the first Gracie to teach the full range of Jiu-Jitsu techniques to students outside the Gracie family. The co-founder of Nova Uniao was Wendell Alexander, who is a key member of one of the most unique lineages in all of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Alexander is one of the few men who can claim a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu lineage that is clear of any Gracie. Unlike the vast majority of BJJ players who trace their instructors back through Carlos Gracie, Alexander’s black belt traces directly back to Mitsuyo Maeda. Maeda taught his Kodokan Judo, blended with some catch wrestling he had learned while traveling Europe, to several students in Brazil, most famously Carlos Gracie. One of Maeda’s first students was Luis Franca, a man who sadly little is written. In 1937, Franca took a student of his own, and while Helio Gracie was learning Jiu-Jitsu for the first time so was young Oswaldo Fadda. Fadda would earn his black belt in 1942 and began to given lessons on the outskirts of Rio. By this time the Gracie family had the made the martial art of Jiu-Jitsu well known but many of their prices for instruction were steep and Gracie Jiu-Jitsu was a martial art of the middle and upper class. Fadda taught his lessons in public areas, opening techniques to lower classes for no charge. In 1950, Fadda and his students finally were able to open their own academy just outside of Rio. The school specialized on footlocks before the rise of Luta Livre made the techniques commonplace in Brazilian grappling. In 1951, Fadda challenged the Gracie Academy in Rio through the Globo Journal famously stating “We wish to challenge the Gracies, we respect them like the formidable adversaries they are but we do not fear them. We have 20 pupils ready for the dispute.” Helio invited Fadda and his students to a competition at the Gracie Academy. Fadda’s students defeated Helio’s, many of them using foot locks though one Fadda student did choke a Gracie student unconscious. While the Gracie’s scoffed at the use of footlocks, referring to it as a “street technique”, they declared Fadda’s victory as a sign that Jiu-Jitsu belonged to everyone. The Globo covered the event and gave Fadda excellent press and new students flocked to his academy, as well as tough man challengers. Over the years Fadda and his students defeated all comers. Fadda would earn the fabled 9th degree rank of red belt, the highest honor bestowed to a non-Gracie. One of Fadda’s students, Sebastiao Ricardo would become instructor to Master Wendell Alexander, who has led instruction in Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .

Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

Alexander began training at the age of 4 in 1970 under Geraldo Flores. Alexander went from toddler to purple belt under Flores, but when Flores moved away Alexander turned to Sebastiao Ricardo. Alexander worked hard under Ricardo, and earned his black belt in 1986. Sebastiao asked Alexander to take over his academy. And when Alexander accepted Sebastiao disappeared, and has not been seen since. Alexander proved an able teacher, if a tentative competitor. During the late 1980s and early 1990s there was not much in the way of competition and Alexander by his own admission did not have to the energy to seek out the elite competition. That said he did win gold at the first IBJJF Pan Ams in 1996 in the Masters (30-35 years old) Black Belt division. Despite not having a competitive fire himself, Alexander’s academy in the late 1990s had many successful students in the younger age groups and lower belt divisions. It was during his time coaching that he met Andre Pederneiras, who also had a very young and talented group of students, but neither of their schools could compete with the sheer weight of numbers of the major teams like Gracie Barra and Alliance. In 1995 they decided to merge their academies in order to compete in the quickly evolving world of sport jiu-jitsu. Together they opened the Nova Uniao Jiu-Jitsu Academy, which combined the very decorated lineages of Carlson Gracie and Oswaldo Fadda to great effect. Some of the school’s first successes were Robson Moura, one of the head professors of Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , who would become regarded as one of the best BJJ players ever winning 7 World titles and guiding the young B.J. Penn to become the first American to win a World Championship in 2000. One of Alexander’s students that would emerge in the 2000s was Leonardo Santos. Santos, like his teacher, started training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at the age of 4 and while Santos enjoyed playing soccer as a youth he was raised in a Jiu-Jitsu family and felt obligated to train.

Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

Santos would grow up under the tutelage of Alexander and become one of the most technical, dynamic and greatest BJJ Lightweights of all time. Santos would medal at IBJJF Worlds in 2000 and 2001, but he became discontented with the IBJFF and declared he would only compete for cash prizes. Santos would then join a rival organization that would become the Confederation of Sport Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (CBJJE) that tried to attract top talent by offering cash prizes. Santos would go undefeated for five years on the World Cup circuit and won the 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 CBJJO World Cups.

 

Santos also became involved in the ADCC Submission Grappling Championships like fellow teammte Jory Malone ( who coaches Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton ) in 2005 and entered into a very competitive field that included Renzo Grace, Georges St. Pierre, Jake Shields, Shinya Aoki, Pablo Popovitch and Marcelo Gracia. Santos defeated future UFC Champion Georges St. Pierre in the quarterfinals…

After ADCCs Santos took a break from competitive grappling to help his brother Wagnney Fabiano open an academy and then Santos shifted his focus to MMA. Fighters like Leo Santos, Wendell Alexander, Oswaldo Fadda and others like Marcelo Pereira who trace their lineages back to Mitsuyo Maeda with no Gracie present keep Luis Franca’s lineage alive today. It remains an important and under valued aspect of a martial art that is so dominated by one family and this lineage is proof that Jiu-Jitsu indeed belongs to everyone.

100% Nova Unaio At Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

Now you can train Nova Uniao Jiu Jitsu with Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton !! Right here at our local Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , we are using the exact same secrets that helped these jiu jitsu players rise to the top. In fact, through Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , we have produced a number of Jiu Jitsu Champions such as Novice World Champion Charles Smith, Pan American NO GI Silver, NO Gi Worlds Bronze Medalist, and Europeans Absolute Bronze Medalist Abby Malone, and Pan No Gi, Pan American and World No Gi Champion Jory Malone. In addition a number of students have won at International Events including Bobby Riley, 2011 Pan No Gi Bronze Medalist, Andy Threlkeld, 2011 Dallas Open Gold Medalist, and Shon Foreman, 2011 Houston Open Silver Medalist. All of these champions train at Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton and Hot Springs! In fact you could be next. Join us at one of Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton and see for yourself!

How Would You Like to Train With These Champions at Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton ?

Revolution is on the cutting edge of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Martial Arts and we are striving to continue our goal to offer World Class Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton . Imagine if you could train with Master Wendell Alexander, UFC Vet and Jiu Jitsu champion Vitor Shaolin, Shooto Figther and one of the top grapplers of all time Robson Moura, or 3x World Champion Marcelo Pereira, 6x World Champion Rodrigo Feijao or Brazilian National Champion Daniel Garcia?  All of these champions and instructors have taught and trained at Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton !  The great thing about it is that we bring these people to you! While  you have the opportunity to attend fun camps to train, you don’t have to do so to get good. You can get good right here!

Get Access To These Secrets In Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton Now!

Get access now with a 30 Day FREE trial  to Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton by clicking HERE! Hurry they are only accepting a few new students at this time and you may be lucky enough to be chosen! Kids are even welcome in our World Class Jiu Jitsu Clasess Benton for kids. “Discover how anyone can train and enjoy martial arts: No matter you sex, age, fitness level, experience level, or even if you want to compete or not at gyms in Benton AR . You’ll see “Raving Reviews” and “real life….real people….success stories” of our happpily involved martial arts students at Revolution’s Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .”

How To Benefit From Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

I received an email this morning from one of the dedicated kids in my Kids’ Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton . The kids tend to get frustrated with grappling quite easily. Sometimes this turn in to a competition. This happens with adults as well. One person does something, the other perceives it as “intentionally rough”, then they step up their game, their partner steps it up in response, and it’s a losing battle from there. I’ve seen this result in adults punching one another. In this instance, one kid (much more advance) was grabbing the others head and pulling it down real tight while holding him in the guard. The kid getting his head pulled was very new (few classes) and about to cry while the other was visibly frustrated. I told them both to relax and sit the rest of the round out and calm down.

Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

Later after class I received the email. It wasn’t the first time I’ve had this question, but it was the first time from a kid via email. I thought over my response. I have to be very careful what I write. Sometimes kids take things too literally, sometimes not literally enough. He asked what he should be doing during grappling in Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .  When you look at it simply, he was doing what he’s supposed to be doing (grappling/ winning) and he was told to relax and had to sit out and calm down. I don’t want to say he got in trouble, but he probably feels that way. In his mind, he was doing right. In reality, he was doing right. He’s not supposed to try to lose. I certainly can’t tell him he should just let the other kid beat him. Not only is this not good for him, but it teaches his newer opponent that doing things wrong works, and that technique doesn’t matter.

So, what should he and other students be doing in his Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton ? Well, quite simply any student should be trying to improve.  While training in Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , you will have a variety of opponents. Some higher in skill set, some lower. With each opponent, the focus should be different. With a more skilled opponent, you should try to work your best techniques and try to perfect a gameplan. With lesser skilled opponents, you should work techniques they are not as good at, or just learned. You see there is a time for everything. In a tournament, you will want to use your best moves. While training in  Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , you will want to try to improve.

Early on in my Martial Arts Career I heard a coach tell us to practice moves we weren’t good at on new people. He was talking about plateaus, and growing out of them. It made a lot of sense to me. Practice new moves, new combinations, and new strategies on new folks. You may not be able to get these moves to work on new folks right away. That’s no problem. Keep trying. Once these moves work on a newer person, work up: try them on someone your rank, and then later work to get them to work on the higher ranks. Once you get these new moves, combinations, setups, etc to work on the high level players, begin working on new ones on the new folks. This is the constant cycle that drives the evolution of your game. This is how you should be training in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .

Not only does this strategy help you but it helps everyone in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton . Sure, I want kids (and adults for that matter) to train safe. They have to learn that there are classroom safe moves, and moves that are better reserved for competition or defense (smashing the head in side control, etc). You want to make sure your partners have a safe comfortable environment. Afterall, if a new person comes in and gets their face smashed the first day, they likely won’t return.  When you run off all of your training partners, how will you improve? You won’t. You need these people. You need them to stick around. On the contrary, higher ranks will want to make sure they are doing everything they can to ensure tight positional control, etc.

On the other hand, you can’t let new folks walk all over you. Especially kids. Kids don’t have the reasoning adults have. I can’t tell him he should take it easy and then expect him to go hard in a tournament. Kid’s don’t have the ability to distinguish when it’s ok and when it’s not. It has to be learned. So, when training in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , never let someone walk all over you to be nice. Not only is this bad for you but it doesn’t help the new person at all. In fact it provides a false sense of security. However there’s things you can do to be nice that help you and your opponent.  If you sense someone is new, scared, or apprehensive, practice what you aren’t good at. If you just learned a new move in class, try it! Let the new person have your back and try to escape. Let them have side control and try to escape. This is optimal for both people. The new person will learn how to establish and control position, while you work escapes and or new strategies. Both of you will improve.  If you have a super tight side control and can smash the you know what out of someone’s head, do you really need to practice this on someone who doesn’t even know how to escape? Probably not. Definitely not.

So, what should you be doing in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton ? The answer is simple: You should be trying to improve. How do you do that?  By practicing appropriate moves on appropriate opponents. Train with purpose, and train to improve. Train for results, not your ego. Follow these simple steps:

1. Learn new moves & develop new strategies through classroom learning and watching matches

2. Practice new strategies and moves on new opponents

3. Once those moves work on new opponents, “graduate” them to higher skilled opponents until they work on the best opponents.

4. Repeat cycle for new moves

Continue this evolution and this will be sure you are not stuck in any plateaus in your training. Train hard, Train Smart, and Train with purpose in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .

Arkansas Jiu Jitsu Practitioners Stand Out at Pan No-Gi Championship

Arkansas Jiu Jitsu Practitioners Stand Out

at Pan No-Gi Championship

Arkansas Jiu Jitsu

Jory Malone, Abby Malone, Bobby Riley

October 1, 2011: New York, New York, Revolution Mixed Martial Arts’ Brazilian Jiu Jitsu team recently traveled to the Pan American No Gi Championships, held in New York, New York on October 1, 2011. Among those traveling were: Jory Malone, Abby Malone and Bobby Riley. Jory Malone won his division, making him the 2011 Pan American No-Gi champion. He also placed bronze medal in the Open Weight class. His wife Abby Malone brought home a silver medal in the women’s black belt division, and a bronze medal in the open weight division. Their student Bobby Riley brought home a bronze medal in the featherweight blue belt division. All competitors represented Arkansas Jiu Jitsu well with their performances.

Jory and Abby both coach the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program at Revolution MMA, and have numerous titles from competitions all over the world. Jory heads up the adult Brazilian jiu jitsu program, while Abby assists in the adult program and heads up the children’s program. Their gyms are located in Benton and Hot Springs Arkansas. Bobby Riley is an assistant in the Benton program. He has been training for over 3 years and this was his first International competition.  The Malone’s started Revolution MMA in 2005, and their Arkansas Jiu Jitsu program continues to produce top quality competitors year after year.

Brought into the limelight recently by the UFC and the Gracie family, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or submission wrestling is a style of grappling or wrestling practiced all over the World. Submission wrestling is the oldest known sport in the World dating back to at least 2300 BC. It was a popular sport in Ancient Greece and described in many celebrated works of Greek literature. Today competitions are held Worldwide and many styles are practiced throughout the World. Practitioners use a highly evolved system of holds, positions, maneuvers and tactics to multiple the leverage of their force with the goal of subduing an opponent. No-Gi refers to submission wrestling without the use of a traditional kimono like Judo.  The Arkansas Jiu Jitsu scene is thriving, and competitors will continue to stand out in future events as well.

Personal Development for Mixed Martial Arts Benton

Mixed Martial Arts BentonPersonal Development for Mixed Martial Arts Benton

In my last two blogs, we talked about what it takes for successful training in Mixed Martial Arts Benton. You have to develop your skill set as well as your athleticism. The final thing you must work on is personal development. Today we are going to discuss some things you can do to develop and improve yourself to reap the rewards from Mixed Martial Arts Benton training. Some things you will want to focus on specifically in your personal development include: will, determination and desire, as noted from yesterdays blog as one of the elements of the Renegade Wheel of Conditioning, as well as time management, and financial management.

Will, Determination, and Desire for Mixed Martial Arts Benton

What do you will to happen with your Mixed Martial Arts Benton training? What is your desire to be? Are you determined to make those things happen? There are several definitions of will, including:  “deliberate or fixed desire or intention”, “thing that one desires or ordains”, “the faculty by which a person decides on and initiates action”, “control deliberately exerted to do something or to restrain one’s own impulses”.  Desire goes along with will, and is defined as: “a strong feeling of wanting to have something or wishing for something to happen “. Essentially, your wills and desires are your dreams, and they become your goals. Your determination drives you to accomplish them.  Determination is simply “the act of committing to a decision”. This is an important aspect in your eventual success with Mixed Martial Arts Benton . Your mental attitude is a direct predictor of your success. If you don’t have the will power to win, to succeed, or to achieve your goals, quite simply you wont.  In addition, your will, desire, and determination help you overcome adversity and avoid temptations. If you are in a training camp for a competition, or working towards your rank or another personal goal for your Mixed Martial Arts Benton training, at some point you will face temptation. Its likely to come from your family and/ or your friends, quite honestly. They might be discouraging you from training, or encouraging you to do things that hurt your training like go out and party, stay up late, etc. You have to have the will to say no, and stay committed to your goals. The second you lose sight of your goals, you begin a downward spiral that will be come increasingly harder to crawl out of.

Time Management: An Important Ingredient in Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success

You have to learn how to manage your time. It’s a skill. Some are better than others at it initially, but everyone can benefit from learning successful time management. If you are disorganized in your life you won’t be successful. You have to be sure to plan your week, setting aside time for your training, recovery, proper eating and anything else. Make sure you keep all appointments, and let nothing stand in the way. Naturally your will, determination and desire are what drive you to set these goals, but you will have to implement these things daily to overcome the daily obstacles that will throw themselves in front of you.  Some of the most basic tips include

  • keeping a daily planner
  • schedule each day/ week in advance for your training schedule
  • keep daily to do lists for your training
  • remain organized – keep your gear clean, and in a place that’s easy to find. Set aside a place in your house that is your training area. You can keep gear there, but also keep literature there if you decide to read or write about your training.
  • focus on one thing at a time, give it your undivided attention – don’t bring yesterdays clutter to todays training.  Clear your head and allow yourself some time to focus 100% on training
  • decide what’s most important – your training should be organized in a periodization schedule and you will want to prioritize what is most important. Depending on when your competition, test or focus event is will depend on what is the priority.
  • know when you work best – if you arent a morning person, don’t schedule your training at 6 am. Likewise if you have to get up early, don’t train until 11 pm. If you want to be successful, you have to organize your time and training when it is to be most productive.

Financial Management, Another Important Ingredient for Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success

And In my opinion the most important. Look, let me be bold and honest here and say that if you arent willing to financially invest in yourself and your training, quit now. It takes a lot of money to be good and successful with Mixed Martial Arts Benton . I am known for being brutally honest at times, so let me tell you that you are going to get hurt and it’s going to cost money. You also have to pay for your lessons and extended training. Your competitions will cost money as well. No one is going to sponsor you until you have invested quite a bit in your success to take yourself to a level in which you will get noticed. In addition, with the chance you do make it to a high level, you will want to continue to investing in yourself: You will have to pay trainers, and hire a manager as well as someone to help you market your persona and build your brand. Your ability to market yourself and attract fans /clients directly translates to the amount of money you are worth as a professional. If you are one of those people who lives paycheck to paycheck it’s time to drastically revolutionize that part of your life. I’d recommend the following:

  • keep all receipts for 1 month, after that month make a list of your expenses by category, analyze all expenses and look at what you can cut out that will free up more money for you to use towards your goal
  • make a budget based on your review/ plan
  • stick to your budget
  • set aside money for savings: you never know when something unfortunate like an injury might occur. Likewise you could lose a job, or simply have an opportunity to attend an exciting training camp. You don’t want to miss out because of poor financial planning.

I hope you have enjoyed my series on the secret keys to Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success!

We established that you need skill development, athletic development and personal development for success. One without the others will not work. I’d encourage you to pick a place to start and try to accomplish 1 task a day. Don’t get discouraged or feel overwhelmed with anything you read. If you haven’t started Mixed Martial Arts Benton this can seem overwhelming. Start small and work towards your goal daily. You can also stop by my gym and get 30 Days Free and a Free Consultation, and we’ll let you in on our secrets of how we make it happen time and time again!

What Does It Take For Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success?

Mixed Martial Arts Benton SuccessWhat Does It Take For Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success?

So you train Mixed Martial Arts Benton….. You might be wondering what it takes to be successful, well, let me help you out a bit. I’ll be honest, it takes a lot to be successful with your Mixed Martial Arts Benton training, but of importance you have to prioritize several things: skill development, athletic development, and personal development. In this article, we are going to focus on skill development in particular in relation to your Mixed Martial Arts Benton Training.

Skill Development for Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success: Lesson 1, Go Where You Can Grow

If you want to be successful with your Mixed Martial Arts Benton training, you have to develop your skill set. First and foremost, this is very important. You want to align yourself with proper coaches, who are able to help you succeed in the desired field. I could go on forever about picking proper coaches, but simply put, pick a place where you feel comfortable. Naturally your Mixed Martial Arts Benton coach should have good communication skills, so that he/ she can effectively deliver the ideas and concepts of technique, and your coach should be well versed and experienced in your chosen skill set. However, if you don’t feel comfortable in the gym, or with the people or coach, you won’t last. So pick a place where you feel like you can grow.

Skill Development for Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success: Lesson 2, Make The Most Of Your Classes

Now: It’s important you go to your Mixed Martial Arts Benton classes. Attend every class you are able to. When most people get started, it’s a big change in lifestyle. Maybe you were used to coming home and watching TV after work, or doing something else. If your job involves physical labor, you are probably pretty tired. Your first few classes you are going to be pretty stoked and ready to train, but let me warn you that feeling is going to wear off.  Some days you are going to be tired, or hurt a bit. You still have to go. It takes 30 days to create a habit, but not much time to break one. In the first 30 days it’s extremely important you attend classes. Do not miss for anything. Even a seasoned student can not take much time off.  If you are sick or hurt, watch class and take notes. But keep the habit alive. Make the most of your Mixed Martial Arts Benton class, by coming prepared.  Clear your mind of the days clutter, eat healthy before class, and focus on the training. Ask questions during or after class.  Practice with intent and purpose. When it’s time for live training, do not train aimlessly. Train with a goal to work on a specific technique, or to improve in a focus area. But in your Mixed Martial Arts Benton training, ALWAYS TRAIN WITH PURPOSE! Finally, take notes! Review them often and practice.

Skill Development for Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success: Lesson 3, Take Advantage of Opportunity

There is more to training than just coming to Mixed Martial Arts Benton classes. If you really want to excel at Mixed Martial Arts Benton , take a private lesson. During a private lesson, your coach will help you specifically with your problems. You can get one on one attention that would be equal to months of regular classes. In addition, attend any seminar you can for your Mixed Martial Arts Benton Training. If you train at a good academy that is part of a good affiliation, you will have the opportunity to train with others who specialize in your chosen art. Attend these seminars and camps. Just like a private lesson, you can learn more in 1 seminar than you can in a month in classes. Now don’t get me wrong, class is extremely important, and if you think you are one of those people who will do only seminars and tournaments and yet miss class and still advance you’re wrong. I am simply stressing how important seminars and private lessons are. You really can learn that much! In addition, if your gym is part of a large association, you will have the opportunity to attend inter-affiliation seminars and other events like training camps. Make sure you go. At these camps you will reinforce your Mixed Martial Arts Benton training, and train with other high ranks who have the same goals, but different game plans and perspectives, thus helping you achieve your goals faster.

Skill Development for Mixed Martial Arts Benton Success: Lesson 4, Compete

Yes, I said it. If you want to get good and improve your skill for Mixed Martial Arts Benton , compete. You don’t have to enter the world championships, and a small tournament is fine. You don’t have to commit to being a lifelong competitor to do it once.  But competition is different from class training. First, it will improve you because you will do a training camp. You will train hard in this training camp, and it will push you to new limits. That alone is worth it. In the competition you will grapple under pressure. Not fun I know, but it will force you to use what you know and try your best. Win or lose, you will learn something about yourself and your techniques. You will likely experience different game plans from your opponents, and you will be sure to remember any mistakes. You can take a video and watch it to learn things to focus on in future Mixed Martial Arts Benton Training. Do it, even if it’s only once. There’s no excuse. None. If you are interested in Mixed Martial Arts Benton Training, check out my gym. At Revolution MMA we offer World Class Mixed Martial Arts. I’ll give you 30 Days Free, a Free E Course and a Free Tshirt, just for coming in! Click Here to get started! Thanks for reading, and feel free to view my past blogs on training here.  I’d encourage you to stay tuned as our next blog will talk about improving your athleticism for success with your Mixed Martial Arts Benton Training.

Martial Arts Arkansas Training Do You Make Cookies or Crap?

Martial Arts ArkansasI debated for quite some time what my first “philosophical” blog should be about, but decided I’d blog about Martial Arts, afterall Martial Arts Arkansas is what I’ve been doing for over 23 years now. Now that’s a broad subject to blog about, but then I remembered teaching a private lesson to some of the kids in my Kids Jiu Jitsu Program.  Learning Jiu Jitsu and Martial Arts Arkansas can be somewhat complex, especially for kids. You see, there are a lot of steps and you have to get them all right or it won’t work.  You see, Martial Arts Arkansas is like anything else in life, and that’s like baking cookies. We’ve all had some experience baking cookies. I have about as much cooking experience as the average guy, but I still understand the basic principle: You have to follow the recipe, otherwise, it’s not cookies, it’s crap.

As you learn and practice the techniques as part of your training in Martial Arts Arkansas , it’s important that you pay close attention to all of the steps involved. Missing 1 step makes the whole thing out of wack; it simply won’t work right. Your entire body has a role in the techique: your arms, legs, abs, and even your mind.  If you leave out 1 ingredient off the cookie recipe, they wont cook right. Leave out 1 step of your techniques, and they simply won’t work right.

So, how do you ensure you get it right? Simple: Repitition, focused training, and proper instruction. Let’s start with proper instruction: You have to learn the right move the right way. You need someone better than you watching you and correcting mistakes. Someone else will notice things you don’t and remind you to do it with precision. As you train, it’s important you focus. You have to clear your mind, and think about nothing but the technique and what you are doing. You have to focus on everything, your arms, legs, body, etc. Notice every detail and try to make it as perfect as possible. Finally, you have to repeat the technique. Repetition builds muscle memory and trains proper movement. Sometimes you should repeat the drill or technique slowly. Paying attention to every detail to make sure it’s correct. Later on, speed it up, but only go as fast as you can with proper technique. Anything faster is a waste.

This week as you train, I encourage you to train with a purpose. Train to make cookies, not crap. Focus on your training. Take notes if needed, and practice at home. Try your best to get it exactly right. Be sure to ask questions. And most importantly, remember that this doesn’t just apply to Martial Arts Arkansas . It applies to everything. There’s  recipe for running your business right, doing your job, relationships, and everything in life. Whatever it is that’s important to you, or you are trying to improve, try to find the recipe and follow it exactly. Do it right and you will be successful.

If you are not yet in a Martial Arts Arkansas Program, let me invite you to our gym! I’ll give you a 30 Day Free Trial, Free Tshirt, Free consultation and Free E course. We offer Mixed Martial Arts Arkansas programs such as:

Jiu Jitsu

Muay Thai Kickboxing

Kids Martial Arts

You can click on any of the above websites and sign up for your Free E course. I’ll call you right away, and you’ll be on your way to training Martial Arts Arkansas !

~Abby

 

Pan No Gi Training Underway with Camp in AL

Pan No Gi Training: On the way!

Training for the Pan No Gi competition in New York has started, and now it’s time to step it up some more.  I normally train 2x a day at least. It depends on where I’m at in the periodization that depends on what I do. But it’s time to kick it off with a training camp in Alabama, so we are on the way. My friend Steve Snyder and his guys in NC are going as well. Daniel Garcia, the 2011 Brazilian National Black Belt Champion is at Steves’ gym, attempting to help Steve get to where he can grapple more than 45 seconds without gassing :). He’s really good, but I suppose you don’t need me to say that. Marcelo also just moved to the US and is at a gym in MS. He was here in Jan 2010 helping me get ready for the Europeans and then spent 6 months here in 2010 at the end of the year working between my and Steve’s gyms.  I really enjoy training with him for competitions, and credit him with a lot in helping my game.

So anyways, Steve is going to see family in AL, and taking Daniel. Marcelo’s going too, and so given it’s a holiday weekend, we are too. There’s 6 of us from Revolution.  The plan was to take 1 car but that didnt work out.  So now we are in 2, driving to AL.  The plan is to train 6 hours a day. I’ll let you know how that goes…..

 

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