How To Benefit From Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

I received an email this morning from one of the dedicated kids in my Kids’ Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton . The kids tend to get frustrated with grappling quite easily. Sometimes this turn in to a competition. This happens with adults as well. One person does something, the other perceives it as “intentionally rough”, then they step up their game, their partner steps it up in response, and it’s a losing battle from there. I’ve seen this result in adults punching one another. In this instance, one kid (much more advance) was grabbing the others head and pulling it down real tight while holding him in the guard. The kid getting his head pulled was very new (few classes) and about to cry while the other was visibly frustrated. I told them both to relax and sit the rest of the round out and calm down.

Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton

Later after class I received the email. It wasn’t the first time I’ve had this question, but it was the first time from a kid via email. I thought over my response. I have to be very careful what I write. Sometimes kids take things too literally, sometimes not literally enough. He asked what he should be doing during grappling in Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .  When you look at it simply, he was doing what he’s supposed to be doing (grappling/ winning) and he was told to relax and had to sit out and calm down. I don’t want to say he got in trouble, but he probably feels that way. In his mind, he was doing right. In reality, he was doing right. He’s not supposed to try to lose. I certainly can’t tell him he should just let the other kid beat him. Not only is this not good for him, but it teaches his newer opponent that doing things wrong works, and that technique doesn’t matter.

So, what should he and other students be doing in his Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton ? Well, quite simply any student should be trying to improve.  While training in Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , you will have a variety of opponents. Some higher in skill set, some lower. With each opponent, the focus should be different. With a more skilled opponent, you should try to work your best techniques and try to perfect a gameplan. With lesser skilled opponents, you should work techniques they are not as good at, or just learned. You see there is a time for everything. In a tournament, you will want to use your best moves. While training in  Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , you will want to try to improve.

Early on in my Martial Arts Career I heard a coach tell us to practice moves we weren’t good at on new people. He was talking about plateaus, and growing out of them. It made a lot of sense to me. Practice new moves, new combinations, and new strategies on new folks. You may not be able to get these moves to work on new folks right away. That’s no problem. Keep trying. Once these moves work on a newer person, work up: try them on someone your rank, and then later work to get them to work on the higher ranks. Once you get these new moves, combinations, setups, etc to work on the high level players, begin working on new ones on the new folks. This is the constant cycle that drives the evolution of your game. This is how you should be training in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .

Not only does this strategy help you but it helps everyone in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton . Sure, I want kids (and adults for that matter) to train safe. They have to learn that there are classroom safe moves, and moves that are better reserved for competition or defense (smashing the head in side control, etc). You want to make sure your partners have a safe comfortable environment. Afterall, if a new person comes in and gets their face smashed the first day, they likely won’t return.  When you run off all of your training partners, how will you improve? You won’t. You need these people. You need them to stick around. On the contrary, higher ranks will want to make sure they are doing everything they can to ensure tight positional control, etc.

On the other hand, you can’t let new folks walk all over you. Especially kids. Kids don’t have the reasoning adults have. I can’t tell him he should take it easy and then expect him to go hard in a tournament. Kid’s don’t have the ability to distinguish when it’s ok and when it’s not. It has to be learned. So, when training in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton , never let someone walk all over you to be nice. Not only is this bad for you but it doesn’t help the new person at all. In fact it provides a false sense of security. However there’s things you can do to be nice that help you and your opponent.  If you sense someone is new, scared, or apprehensive, practice what you aren’t good at. If you just learned a new move in class, try it! Let the new person have your back and try to escape. Let them have side control and try to escape. This is optimal for both people. The new person will learn how to establish and control position, while you work escapes and or new strategies. Both of you will improve.  If you have a super tight side control and can smash the you know what out of someone’s head, do you really need to practice this on someone who doesn’t even know how to escape? Probably not. Definitely not.

So, what should you be doing in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton ? The answer is simple: You should be trying to improve. How do you do that?  By practicing appropriate moves on appropriate opponents. Train with purpose, and train to improve. Train for results, not your ego. Follow these simple steps:

1. Learn new moves & develop new strategies through classroom learning and watching matches

2. Practice new strategies and moves on new opponents

3. Once those moves work on new opponents, “graduate” them to higher skilled opponents until they work on the best opponents.

4. Repeat cycle for new moves

Continue this evolution and this will be sure you are not stuck in any plateaus in your training. Train hard, Train Smart, and Train with purpose in your Jiu Jitsu Classes Benton .

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